Re: This Old house

Djpekingman wrote:
albert herbert hawkins wrote:
space wrote:

If you are the moaning type, perhaps a grade II listed building wasn't the best buy for you.

Grade 2 is a very wide band. This is not a building of specific architectuaral interest and nobody famous lived there, it's just Georgian. The thing is as always with local authorities is the interpretation that they apply. Generally if there is an opportunity to be a cunt they are going to take a firm grip with both hands. The thing is we are not unreasonable at all. The UPVC conservatory for instance is being sorted with timber, the fabric of the building will be restored and protected. We just like a little confort and lower heating bills in the winter months. The way to achieve this is upgrading the loft insulation, not planning required. Thermal cladding to the internal walls, grey are this one as it is covered in plaster so who would know the difference. and the double glazed panels. Such panels have been used in sash windows with a much harder listing than ours, the vagary of the system though in the UK is that you are at the mercy of people who often hate you because you have more money than them.

In a 290k house? Don't flatter yourself.


Its actually a 600K house we got cheap as it needs a load of work, we've 80K set aside but I think it will top 100k. The district surveyor came in yesterday and said no to sealed glazed units in the sashes, this just seems the current trend as I know buildings with far more stringent listings than ours have been done. We'll get the sashes done and see how we go, we may choose to put the double glazed panels in later. The bonkers thing is the daft cow suggested secondary glazing as an alternative! She suggest some shit solution instead of tanking the basement which our surveyors is kicking the shit out of her over and winning. she's against internal wall insulation just because she is! We'll be revisiting that. She's happy for us to do something with the white UPVC conservatory - quell surprise! We'll propose straift timber replacement and dare her to object. Roof works are fine. Access steps to the front basement probably but she wants us to go the difficult way round. She's also happy for us to remove the skylight over the stairs which is very nice of her as we never asked for this in the first place.

Shame about Oracle man being no more.

Fascista, Communista, Tory Boy or Labourista, come and view the whole damn vista, om pom push

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Re: This Old house

Djpekingman wrote:
albert herbert hawkins wrote:
space wrote:

If you are the moaning type, perhaps a grade II listed building wasn't the best buy for you.

Grade 2 is a very wide band. This is not a building of specific architectuaral interest and nobody famous lived there, it's just Georgian. The thing is as always with local authorities is the interpretation that they apply. Generally if there is an opportunity to be a cunt they are going to take a firm grip with both hands. The thing is we are not unreasonable at all. The UPVC conservatory for instance is being sorted with timber, the fabric of the building will be restored and protected. We just like a little confort and lower heating bills in the winter months. The way to achieve this is upgrading the loft insulation, not planning required. Thermal cladding to the internal walls, grey are this one as it is covered in plaster so who would know the difference. and the double glazed panels. Such panels have been used in sash windows with a much harder listing than ours, the vagary of the system though in the UK is that you are at the mercy of people who often hate you because you have more money than them.

In a 290k house? Don't flatter yourself.


Its actually a 600K house we got cheap as it needs a load of work, we've 80K set aside but I think it will top 100k. The district surveyor came in yesterday and said no to sealed glazed units in the sashes, this just seems the current trend as I know buildings with far more stringent listings than ours have been done. We'll get the sashes done and see how we go, we may choose to put the double glazed panels in later. The bonkers thing is the daft cow suggested secondary glazing as an alternative! She suggest some shit solution instead of tanking the basement which our surveyors is kicking the shit out of her over and winning. she's against internal wall insulation just because she is! We'll be revisiting that. She's happy for us to do something with the white UPVC conservatory - quell surprise! We'll propose straift timber replacement and dare her to object. Roof works are fine. Access steps to the front basement probably but she wants us to go the difficult way round. She's also happy for us to remove the skylight over the stairs which is very nice of her as we never asked for this in the first place.

Shame about coracle man being no more.

Last edited by albert herbert hawkins (Tue 19 Apr 2016 8:13 am)

Fascista, Communista, Tory Boy or Labourista, come and view the whole damn vista, om pom push

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Re: This Old house

Sounds like you've got you self a bargain AHH.  Shrewsbury can flood like fuck though, are you away from the river?

I'd offer you a beer, but I've only got six cans.

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Re: This Old house

Aye we're, up the hill. When in gets up as far as us East Anglia will be under the North Sea.

Fascista, Communista, Tory Boy or Labourista, come and view the whole damn vista, om pom push

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Re: This Old house

Mol wrote:

Smarts always beat brains. As one estranged sister said to me "In Mensa when you were nine, not an ounce of common sense at thirty nine, you're a fucking idiot".

big_smile

Tickled me did that - cheers Mol

You are what you repeatedly do. Excellence is not an event - it is a habit.

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Re: This Old house

Travis Bickle wrote:
Mol wrote:

Worth it for the contacts they'll make if now't else. That's what opens doors.

Friends not contacts. That's kind of my point. Of course going to one of the best universities increases your chances of 'getting on' but my old man became a teacher and then a lecturer after his degree (he got a first, then did his masters etc), hardly a captain of industry on a massive wedge.
But he was exposed to so much, art, culture etc and he learnt to and was encouraged to think. Sounds daft but feeding your head is good for you. Again, I know things have changed. It's a different world and academia has changed with it. But I love the thought of one of my kids going to somewhere where they can think and be free to do so. I'm rambling but you get my point.

Not sure being exposed to art and culture and what not is the sole privilege of those that attend (or hang around with those that attend) Uni Trav.  I'm in a cultural black hole to be honest and I have a degree - mind,  I did go to Boro wink

My point stands though.  As with most things,  the influence of parents in early years makes the most impact.  I have friends who didn't go to Uni,  their parents didn't go to Unit but they'd piss on most people when it comes to knowledge of art / music / literature

You are what you repeatedly do. Excellence is not an event - it is a habit.

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Re: This Old house

Is there any value in that nowadays? Moving from the 1930's onwards a wide knowledge of topics was seen as desire able and a product of a good education. In those days a good education opened doors for a good job (well paid) & a good life. I think that had lessened over time and money is seen as the desirable thing. In today's society money usually comes with knowing one thing really well. Also regarding going to Oxbridge, you'd still be a kid from a comp in Leeds, whereas 80%+ of your contemporaries would be prep & public school. You'll be going home at Xmas, they'd be going to see mummy & daddy in gstad. The meaningful contacts are made a lot earlier than 18, and in different social circles.

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Re: This Old house

albert herbert hawkins wrote:

Aye we're, up the hill. When in gets up as far as us East Anglia will be under the North Sea.

Good.  It's a nice place too.  Lots of big gaffs like that and as you say.  £600k is about on the money for one probably smaller than you describe.

Fuck knows how though, what kind of wages do they pay for farm-handing these days?

Last edited by Reggie Perrin (Tue 19 Apr 2016 4:09 pm)

I'd offer you a beer, but I've only got six cans.

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Re: This Old house

Ray Hankin's shorts wrote:
Travis Bickle wrote:
Mol wrote:

Worth it for the contacts they'll make if now't else. That's what opens doors.

Friends not contacts. That's kind of my point. Of course going to one of the best universities increases your chances of 'getting on' but my old man became a teacher and then a lecturer after his degree (he got a first, then did his masters etc), hardly a captain of industry on a massive wedge.
But he was exposed to so much, art, culture etc and he learnt to and was encouraged to think. Sounds daft but feeding your head is good for you. Again, I know things have changed. It's a different world and academia has changed with it. But I love the thought of one of my kids going to somewhere where they can think and be free to do so. I'm rambling but you get my point.

Not sure being exposed to art and culture and what not is the sole privilege of those that attend (or hang around with those that attend) Uni Trav.  I'm in a cultural black hole to be honest and I have a degree - mind,  I did go to Boro wink

My point stands though.  As with most things,  the influence of parents in early years makes the most impact.  I have friends who didn't go to Uni,  their parents didn't go to Unit but they'd piss on most people when it comes to knowledge of art / music / literature

It's not the sole privilege but can still be the only opportunity. None of these things are absolutes and, as I said, the world has moved on from the old man's generation but as a vehicle for 'development' it still takes some beating. Particularly if you go to a 'top' university.
As for its 'value', I'm talking about the value for the individual not necessarily how much you'll earn on the back of it. Having said that, go to LSE, Oxford and certain others, you'll not be short of a bob or too.
Friends of mine that went to Oxford and Cambridge from 'normal' backgrounds mixed with all sorts, toffs and oiks. There'll always be those at the very top, the landed types that have no desire to mix, but you're never going to enter that world no matter what you do, even if you were minded to want to...

She’s the main man in the office in the city and she treats me like I’m just another lackey, but I can put a tennis racket up against my face and pretend that I am Kendo Nagasaki...

Re: This Old house

Misura wrote:

Is there any value in that nowadays? Moving from the 1930's onwards a wide knowledge of topics was seen as desire able and a product of a good education. In those days a good education opened doors for a good job (well paid) & a good life. I think that had lessened over time and money is seen as the desirable thing. In today's society money usually comes with knowing one thing really well. Also regarding going to Oxbridge, you'd still be a kid from a comp in Leeds, whereas 80%+ of your contemporaries would be prep & public school. You'll be going home at Xmas, they'd be going to see mummy & daddy in gstad. The meaningful contacts are made a lot earlier than 18, and in different social circles.

Agree with this, know a couple of friends who went to Oxford, had to play the game bite their tongue, got accepted eventually, token northerners, little bit blue but we love 'em. Obviously they have done very well for themselves, had to work twice as hard, lots of self doubt whilst there. Upside being the teaching is second to none. One on one tuition in most cases. If you're happy to drink the privilege Kool-Aid then it can be a step up. Both my mates are barristers like Trav, had to work their socks off and play the court jester a bit to get by, but that's what they wanted.

Another mate from Hackney. Just a really smart guy. Got a 2 E A-level offer to Christchurch (Oxford) to read PPE (the degree that gets you a seat in government or fast-tracked as CEO at ICI, RBS, British Telecom, etc, got a 5% applicant acceptance rate - unless your Tory then you're straight in no questions asked.) He had to go for an interview to get the offer, which he passed with flying colours, even went for beers with the Dean (he's that kid of lad). Got the offer but declined as a couple of plummy students who were interviewing at the same time took the piss out of him for having a copy of The Mirror with him and for nipping off to McDonalds for his breakfast instead of having porridge and fry up in the great hall. Went to Leeds, got a 1st, started a band, did some animation, sued Coca Cola for completely ripping off one his films, took an undisclosed sum out of court, loved his time in Leeds, can do a perfect Leeds accent..

Last edited by king of the slums (Tue 19 Apr 2016 9:38 pm)

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Re: This Old house

I'm with Trav on this one. I don't measure a good life in purely financial terms, in fact, hardly at all. Granted you need a certain amount of money to live comfortably, in a decent neighbourhood but if money and possessions are your thing we have different mindsets.

Ever read a history book purely for pleasure? With hindsight, I think uni would have been ace. Running round football grounds acting like a fucking idiot, dear God, what a waste.

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Re: This Old house

Cuts wrote:

I'm with Trav on this one. I don't measure a good life in purely financial terms, in fact, hardly at all. Granted you need a certain amount of money to live comfortably, in a decent neighbourhood but if money and possessions are your thing we have different mindsets.

Ever read a history book purely for pleasure? With hindsight, I think uni would have been ace. Running round football grounds acting like a fucking idiot, dear God, what a waste.

I did both Cuts and wouldn't want to lose either

Experiences form the person right?  Some people seek out new stuff,  some don't.  Whether they go to Uni or not doesn't matter in my eyes.  As for cash,  nowadays it's easier to break the ceiling and the % of 'posh boys' who get jobs given to them because of their school tie is reducing quickly - bar a few,  minority areas such as politics and segments of the financial services industry

You are what you repeatedly do. Excellence is not an event - it is a habit.

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Re: This Old house

Cuts wrote:

I'm with Trav on this one. I don't measure a good life in purely financial terms, in fact, hardly at all. Granted you need a certain amount of money to live comfortably, in a decent neighbourhood but if money and possessions are your thing we have different mindsets.

Ever read a history book purely for pleasure? With hindsight, I think uni would have been ace. Running round football grounds acting like a fucking idiot, dear God, what a waste.

You've misunderstood me, cuts. I was commenting on society as opposed to personally. The 'good life' reference was describing the difference between working down a mine/factory floor/tools or in an office, which was the choice education gave you in the 40's/50's/60's, usually straight after your 11 plus. Then a further split at 16, then another at 18. Where you ended up had a massive impact on your earning capacity, health and future life. Plumbers weren't earning £100k a year in the 50's. smile

Without stating the obvious, money is becoming increasingly important to live to a decent standard and future proof yourself & family. What we had for free 30 years ago, will be very expensive in 10 years time. I'm not saying be obsessed by it, but recognize its importance, but not let it be your master. Saving and sensible use of money are being dissuaded, as they don't fuel the economy and the current generation is being conditioned to consume & be consumeristic. Be money obsessed, earn & borrow, but spend it on valueless shit.

The general spread of Universities have been devalued tbh. Just a way a clever way of keeping under 21's of the jobless figures, making them spend £'s they don't have and making them feel that they've achieved something. It also makes them more malleable when they graduate, as people up to their arm pits in debt haven't got time to be bolshy.  It's not like educating rita you know, where everyone is sat around talking about assonance, half of the kids are dressing up, fighting, shagging, taking drugs and getting pissed, the other half are foreign students being milked like cash cows.

'Uni' to a large number of kids is the same kind of youth cult that football was 30 years ago, just in a different setting. The education system has been clever and realised this, they've just pulled up the ladder a couple of rungs, and made postgraduate qualification/professional membership the bench mark and change a lot more money for the privilege.

Running around football grounds? It was fun whilst it lasted & it didn't do you any serious harm/lasting damage did it? You've grown out of it and you've not served prison time for it. You've got enough about you to be self aware and have kicked on, and continue to do so. There's a great deal to be said about self learning and that comes with age & experience.

Last edited by Misura (Wed 20 Apr 2016 1:07 pm)

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Re: This Old house

Going to UNI after taking a levels at night school, causing anarchy for a couple of years and getting chucked out never did me any lasting harm. I suppose it makes me wonder what I might have achieved had I lasted the course, but then again do I really care - I've had a lot of fun and done a lot of stuff and continue to do so. So its bollocks really. Alternatively I could have just plodded.

I suppose what might have helped me is that when I left school for the second time at 17 after going back to take A levels, my first job was with the Geological Survey, which was probably better than a university education. A lot of good people who encouraged you, but equally a bunch of academic types totally unsuited for life in the real world - I was shift leading on the offshore sampling vessels because quite simply I was more practical and pragmatic than the PHd ridden academics I was in charge of. At Uni, one of my tutors had worked for british steel for 30 years so I got on well with him. The rest were a bunch of overage career student wasters.

Last edited by Djpekingman (Wed 20 Apr 2016 2:19 pm)

Only those who dream will someday see their dreams converted to reality

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Re: This Old house

Get what you're saying. I'm hoping it shows them alternatives to the rat race. I'm hoping it will give them ideas so they can live life not just go through the motions. It's not really important if it comes from a textbook or a conversation with someone from a different walk of life.

All that football carrying on? Always on the edges at best. Think I'd have been better served getting some money together and getting off having a look around the world.

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Re: This Old house

Djpekingman wrote:

So its bollocks really. Alternatively I could have just plodded.

A missed opportunity dear boy.

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Re: This Old house

Ray Hankin's shorts wrote:
Mol wrote:

Smarts always beat brains. As one estranged sister said to me "In Mensa when you were nine, not an ounce of common sense at thirty nine, you're a fucking idiot".

big_smile

Tickled me did that - cheers Mol

Aye little Mol, the Ruth Lawrence of Mayo. big_smile

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Re: This Old house

Uni was a big disappointment for me, I loved the course and the work, but my fellow students didn't want to be there, it was just something they had to go through to get to where they wanted to be. They put in minimal effort and then fucked off.

I went aged 28, I went from factory production line not really aware of the possibilities out there,  to someone who wanted to do something they loved. There was no way i was leaving Uni and taking a job because it paid a wage. I've enjoyed my jobs ever since all betting related.

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Re: This Old house

Manipulation , one has a firm wanting employees his mate from uni all those years ago starts a recruitment agency and before you know it both are dictating hourly rates employment rights and Salarys cunts and parasites all of them

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Re: This Old house

Manipulation , one has a firm wanting employees his mate from uni all those years ago starts a recruitment agency and before you know it both are dictating hourly rates employment rights and Salarys cunts and parasites all of them

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